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    Florida Republicans reportedly fear they miscalculated on new voting restrictions

    Some Florida Republicans are reportedly growing concerned that a new bill curbing the use of mail-in voting could end up backfiring on the party. After Florida’s state legislature recently passed a bill to place new restrictions on mail ballots, some Republicans in the state are “reacting with alarm,” The Washington Post reports. After all, the bill will be “curtailing a practice that millions of state Republicans use,” the Post writes, and Republicans are worried their “political fortunes are in peril” as a result. The bill, for example, requires that voters reapply for mail ballots each two-year cycle, whereas the current law requires them to reapply every four years, and it also restricts the use of drop boxes, the report notes. The state legislature moved to enact the changes following the 2020 presidential election, during which former President Donald Trump attacked the use of mail-in voting. But almost 35 percent of GOP voters in Florida cast their ballots by mail in 2020, and Republicans fear the bill will “further undercut the party’s ability to encourage mail voting,” the Post writes. “Donald Trump attempted to ruin a perfectly safe and trusted method of voting,” a Republican consultant told the Post. “The main law that we pass when we pass election bills in Florida is the law of unintended consequences.” One former state party official expressed particular concern that military personnel “might not think they have to request a ballot” and seniors “might not know the law has changed, and they might not get a ballot.” Some Republicans reportedly discussed trying to exclude these two groups from the requirement to request mail ballots each cycle but were told this would “raise equal protection problems.” Republican State Sen. Joe Gruters denied to the Post that the bill will “hurt anybody, Republicans or Democrats,” arguing “people are going to understand the changes that we me made long before another election comes around.” Read more at The Washington Post. More stories from theweek.com5 brutally funny cartoons about Giuliani’s legal woesEurope is back in recession. It’s not just the virus.Congressional hearing derailed for over 20 minutes as audio from Galaxy Quest plays

    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis denies systemic racism exists. Critics say his state’s new voting law is a clear example.

    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) says the idea that the U.S. has systemic policies that perpetuate racism is absolute “horse manure.” While speaking to Fox News’ Laura Ingraham at a governors’ town hall event on Thursday night, DeSantis was asked about systemic racism, which Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) discussed in his rebuttal to President Biden’s speech to Congress. Scott declared “America is not a racist country,” an increasingly hot topic as politicians disagree “over the pervasiveness of non-obvious racism within systems,” writes The Washington Post. DeSantis’ position in the debate is obviously clear, as he called the notion of systemic racism “a bunch of horse manure.” But the timing of his comments was conspicuous, as earlier that same day, Florida’s Republican-led legislature passed new rules on voting that Black lawmakers said would make it harder for millions of voters, especially people of color, to cast ballots. DeSantis said “of course” he’ll sign the bill into law. “Give me a break,” DeSantis told Ingraham, arguing that because “we’ve had people that have been able to succeed” the system must be fine. However, the latest voting law, which restricts voting by mail and ballot drop boxes, has been criticized as an example of systemic racism in that it deepens longstanding discrepancies between voting access for white voters and nonwhite voters — Florida state Rep. Omari Hardy (D) called the bill “the revival of Jim Crow in this state, whether the sponsors admit it or not.” Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-FL) calls the idea of systemic racism “a bunch of horse manure.” “Give me a break … It’s a very harmful ideology, and I would say really a race-based version of a Marxist-type ideology.” pic.twitter.com/xcTuLmZtoE — The Recount (@therecount) April 30, 2021 More stories from theweek.comRepublicans reveal their red lineThere’s no such thing as intellectual propertyKazuo Ishiguro’s Klara illuminates what meritocracy does to the soul

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